Coreopsis Redshift

Redshift Tickseed

 
Red and Yellow Coreopsis Redshift, Coreopsis Redshift, Redshift Tickseed View Larger Image

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24-30" x 18-24" wide. 'Redshift' is a vigorous hybrid Tickseed that blooms all summer with large, red and yellow flowers that change colors as the seasonal temperatures change from cool to hot.

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Regular Price: $11.99

Sale $9.59

per plant - 5" deep pot You save: 20%
Zones 4 - 9
Advantages
Deer Resistant
Deer Resistant
Attract Butterflies
Attract Butterflies
Rabbit Resistant
Rabbit Resistant
Native
Light Requirements
Full Sun
Full Sun
Annual Rainfall
Average
10 to 20", 20 to 30", 30 to 40", 40 to 50"
Bloom Time Late spring to early summer
Shipping Shipping begins in late February based on ground temperatures, warmest zones first. More shipping info Learn More…
Size Plant - 5" deep pot
SKU HBLP851

Details

24-30" x 18-24" wide. A vigorous hybrid Tickseed, 'Redshift' blooms with large red and yellow daisy-like flowers all summer. The flower color is affected by temperature and is constantly shifting all season, hence the cultivar name. In summer, yellow shades predominate, while in the cool of fall, the flowers are mostly red. Very cold hardy and tolerant of heat and humidity, 'Redshift' is an introduction from Coreopsis breeder Darrel Probst.
SKU HBLP851
Common Name Redshift Tickseed
Botanical Name Coreopsis Redshift
Zones 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Light Requirements Full Sun
Flower Color Red, Yellow
Mature Height 24-30" tall
Mature Spread 18-24" wide
Bloom Time Late spring to early summer
Ships As Potted Plant
Native Yes
Planting Time Spring / Summer, Fall
Soil Type Compost Enriched Garden Loam Soil
Soil Moisture Average
Amount of Rain 10 to 20", 20 to 30", 30 to 40", 40 to 50"
Advantages Deer Resistant, Attract Butterflies, Rabbit Resistant, Native
Ideal Region Anywhere In The US, Northeast, Midwest, Southwest, West, Pacific Northwest
Neonicotinoid-Free Yes - Learn More
Ships to Hawaii, Alaska & Canada No

Planting Guides

Tips For Growing Coreopsis (Tickseed)

Coreopsis (Tickseed) are long-blooming native wildflowers that are easy-to-grow and provide ample nectar for butterflies. They're resistant to browsing rabbits and deer. Coreopsis can be divided into two groups that have different growing requirements: Coreopsis grandiflora and Coreopsis verticiliata (Threadleaf Tickseed) cultivars and hybrids.

1. Coreopsis grandiflora types (Tickseed) - these cultivars are generally grown from seed and are a short-lived perennial (3 to 4 years).

Preferred growing conditions:

  • Needs sandy/gravely and sandy loam type soils. Avoid clay.
  • Does best with gravel mulches.
  • After their second growing season, only requires deep but infrequent watering. Too much water makes them floppy and shortens their lifespan.
  • Plant in full hot sun.
  • Adding just a few handfuls of compost and Yum Yum Mix in the planting hole is enough. Don't plant into a rich, highly-amended soil.

Special comments

  • Deadhead plants to prolong bloom. Leave a few seed pods on the plants to encourage re-seeding.

2. Coreopsis verticillata (Threadleaf tickseed) and hybrids - These are long-lived perennials that spread by rhizomes to form wide, dense growing clumps.

Preferred growing conditions:

  • These species grow in a wide range of soil types including clay. Avoid very alkaline soils as they may get chlorotic (yellow foliage) due to unavailability of iron and other trace minerals.
  • These plants don't need mulching except in hot climates.
  • These are moisture-loving perennials and do best in moderately moist soil conditions.
  • Plant in full sun areas.
  • They like compost-enriched soils at planting time.

Special comments

Threadleaf tickseed plants are often late to wake in spring from dormancy, so don't worry when other neighboring perennials wake up first.

Garden care for all types of Coreopsis:

  • Fertilize Coreopsis just once in fall with Yum Yum Mix and Planters II. In addition, for C. verticillata types, green sand is recommended for alkaline soils to correct or prevent chlorosis.
  • Plants can be divided in mid-spring when clumps die-out in the center or become too large for their place in the garden.
  • Leave all Coreopsis varieties standing over the winter and cut back to 1-2" inches above the soil in mid-spring when the plants begin to wake up.

View more Planting Guides, or download our complete Planting Guide for tips on caring for your plants when you receive your order, as well as planting instructions for Perennials, Spring-Planted Bulbs, Fall-Planted Bulbs, Cacti & Succulents, Xeric Plants and more.

Shipping

Plant Shipping: Buy now and we will ship your order at the ideal planting time for your region. Spring-Planted Perennial and Bulb orders will ship from February 27-June 30, warmest zones first. Most plant orders will arrive within 3-4 days, or less, of leaving our greenhouses. This prompt delivery is provided without additional express charges.

Grass Plugs Will ship at planting time in spring 2017, beginning in late February.

Wildflower Seed & Grass Seed Orders ship within 2-3 days.

Standard shipping costs are $4.99 and up, depending on the size of the order.

Make Fast Even Faster: For ‘Rush’ same week delivery, please call customer service at 800-925-9387.

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Reviewsby PowerReviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
High Country GardensCoreopsis Redshift
 
4.2

(based on 6 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (1)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (2)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (0)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Attractive (6)
  • Accurate instructions (4)
  • Healthy (3)

Cons

No Cons

Best Uses

  • Garden (5)
  • Outdoors (5)
    • Reviewer Profile:
    • Avid gardener (4)
    • Primary use:
    • Personal (6)

Reviewed by 6 customers

Displaying reviews 1-6

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5.0

Beautiful delicate flowers

By 

from Blairstown NJ

About Me Avid Gardener

See all my reviews

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Accurate Instructions
  • Attractive
  • Healthy
  • Lightweight
  • Versatile

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Outdoors

    Comments about High Country Gardens Coreopsis Redshift:

    These are placed in various spots in my garden and help,bring out colors of the other plants as well as stand out on their own. Delicate yet noticeable on their own with all the blooms. Constantly blooming all summer long.

    • Primary use:
    • Personal
     
    3.0

    Both Died in Second Year

    By 

    from Parker, CO

    About Me Avid Gardener

    Verified Reviewer

    Pros

    • Accurate Instructions
    • Attractive

    Cons

    • Short Life

    Best Uses

    • Garden
    • Outdoors

    Comments about High Country Gardens Coreopsis Redshift:

    I bought two of these. I planted them in early spring, and by mid-summer they were gorgeous. They ever turned pink though...they were yellow with dark middles. One died that fall. It went from gorgeous to dead. I think it may have drowned... The second one started coming up this spring, but just looked weak a puny. We got a late freeze, and that ended it. Guess it wasn't meant to be. I have very heavy clay soil, which I amended with composted horse manure. Most of my plants do great in it, but these guys didn't seem to appreciate it. I think they may be happier in something fluffier. Even though they didn't work for me, I'd still recommend trying them. They were gorgeous and full while in bloom. I just think they didn't like my soil.

    • Primary use:
    • Personal
     
    5.0

    Beautiful flower.

    By 

    from Hughesville, PA

    About Me Master Gardener

    See all my reviews

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Accurate Instructions
    • Attractive
    • Versatile

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Garden
      • Outdoors
      • Patio

      Comments about High Country Gardens Coreopsis Redshift:

      I planted this plant in one of my larger flowerbeds as an experiment to see if it will come back the next year - I will have to wait until spring to find out. If it survives, I would like to plant several more.

      • Primary use:
      • Personal

      (1 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

       
      5.0

      Wow

      By 

      from Midwest

      About Me Avid Gardener

      Pros

      • Attractive
      • Hardy
      • Healthy

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Outdoors

        Comments about High Country Gardens Coreopsis Redshift:

        Wow I planted this in the spring and by mid summer it was huge with lots of flowers! It looked like it was 3 plants instead of just one. Pretty.

        • Primary use:
        • Personal

        (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

         
        3.0

        Waiting for next year

        By 

        from Colorado Rockies

        About Me Getting Started

        Pros

        • Accurate Instructions
        • Attractive
        • Lightweight

        Cons

        • Small In Size

        Best Uses

        • Garden

        Comments about High Country Gardens Coreopsis Redshift:

        Really liked the catalog description; but this first year it was pretty small and didn't flower much or for very long. I'm waiting, hopefully, to see how it does in a second year.

        • Primary use:
        • Personal

        (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

         
        4.0

        Great looking plant.

        By 

        from Grand Junction Colorado

        About Me Avid Gardener

        Pros

        • Attractive
        • Hardy
        • Healthy

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Garden
          • Outdoors

          Comments about High Country Gardens Coreopsis Redshift:

          Great plant for flower bed.

          • Primary use:
          • Personal

          Displaying reviews 1-6

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          Q & A

          Suggested Companion Plants:

          USDA Hardiness Planting Zones

          To determine if a plant is sufficiently cold hardy, the USDA created numbered zones indicating winter low temperatures; the lower the zone number the colder the winter.

          • If the coldest winter temperature expected in your area is -15°F (zone 5) then any plants rated zones 3-5 will survive the winter temperatures in your area.
          • If you live in very warm winter areas (zones 9-11) plants with zones 3-4 ratings are not recommended. The lack of freezing winter temperatures do not provide a time for winter dormancy (rest).

          Find Your Planting Zone:

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